Category Archives: Digital photography tips

New Photo project for the New Year – 2012 IMAGE MAKER’S 52 PHOTO WALK program

Photographer Dan Splaine of Test of Time photography in Nashua NH announces the 2012 IMAGE MAKER"S 52 WEEK PHOTO WALK. Splaine is a photo educator who presents a program of digital photography workshops and photographer tours ©2012 Daniel J. Splaine.

 

The New Year is upon us and of course our inclination is to set some goals and resolutions to carry out in 2012.  One of the goals I have tasked myself with is spend some time on a regular basis practicing my photography skills.  This goal has led me to develop a program that I would like to share with other photographer’s to help them grow their photographic skills.

I invite you to join me for the 2012 IMAGE MAKER’S 52 WEEK PHOTO WALK program.  The concept is simple, make a commitment to take a walk with your camera for one half hour once a week and post a single image from that excursion online. The aim is 52 new images in 52 weeks. The idea behind this is to spend a small amount of time each week practicing your skills , and over the course of the year your work will improve.  The weekly  investment in time and effort can easily be accomplished and the online conversation will  encourage folks to stick with it for the entire year.

 

The photos will be posted and shared online through a Flickr group I have organized.  

Full details and the rules for participating are listed on the Test of Time Photography website CLICK HERE

Jump into the challenge, the more folks participating the more motivation to continue.  Sign  up here

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Developing your photographic style

Often a photographer’s identity can be determined by simply viewing an image.  Their personal style is so well-formed that each photograph they create is readily recognized as distinctly their own.  Consider the example of Ansel Adams.  His images are iconic and if you are not familiar with each  photo he made you arguably would know one when you saw it.

So how does a beginner photographer develop their own photographic style?

The ability to create original photography on a consistent basis requires practice and skill. For those starting to learn photography I suggest two paths to follow on the way to establishing their own unique photographic style.

My first suggestion and something I urge photographers of all skill levels is to study the work of other photographers. An examination and understanding of the images created by others will help inform you own perspective.  I am not suggesting that you mimic the style of others, rather use their work as inspiration and a source of insight about photographic content, technique and design.

In my over 30 year professional photography career I have constantly referred to the work of other photographers to expand my understanding and refine my personal point of view.  Other photography provides reference points and a standard for comparison.  Apply that reference material to your imagination and intellect to create the photography that illustrates your own unique viewpoint.  As you develop your photographic skills learn how to deconstruct the images of others to find the techniques applied in their creation.

Digitla photography student at New Hampshire photography workshop hosted by photographer Dan SplaineMy second suggestion is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the camera and the photographic options that it provides.  Understanding the physical controls and how incremental adjustment will affect your photograph is fundamental to achieving predictable results.  Creative control of your photography begins with technical expertise.  To make the photography that matches your vision you need to know how to control your camera.

Making correct exposure, understanding optical choices and focus control are fundamental photography skills. Once you establish mastery of technique you can then maintain creative control, you can actually begin to shoot and make consistent results.

Your own personal photographic style is a product of your imagination and how you process your experiences and impressions. Digital photography requires study and practice to be creatively consistent.   That consistency of results builds the the foundation of style.  Ansel Adams did not get accidental results; his beautiful photography was the product of exceptional technique and a highly personalized vision.

To learn more about digital photography and to learn more about this topic you should consider attending a photography workshop.  I offer a full program of digital photography workshops and photography tours for adult photographers.  On September 14, 2011 (7 to 9 pm) I am holding the PHOTO COMPOSITION and DESIGN workshop at the TEST of TIME PHOTO studio in Nashua, NH.  Please consider attending this or any one of my many digital photo classes.

Pro photographer and photo educator Dan Splaine of Test of Time Photography in Nashua, Nh

Dan Splaine _ Photographer

 

About the Author:  Dan Splaine is a professional photographer and photo educator who operates a commercial photography business in Nashua, NH.  He produces custom, unique images for businesses, institutions and individuals (regionally and nationally) with particular expertise in public relations and location photography. In his thirty plus years photo career he has photographed in dozens of countries and location ranging from rain forests to the halls of congress. He teaches photography workshops at his New Hampshire studio and conducts photography tours in New England and internationally.

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A photo educator’s philosophy- From simply picture taking to image making

What do I mean when I distinguish between simply “taking pictures” and the photographic method of “mage making”?   Image making is a deliberate process for creating original photography that produces predictable and repeatable results. Picture taking is random and sporadically produces good images. Shooting snapshots can be fun and for the average digital photographer and can provide plenty of satisfaction.  For shooters who have higher photographic aspirations a more skillful and deliberate approach is required.

 

Squid fishing boat passing under the setting sun in Ko-Panang , Thailand. Image by photographer Dan Splaine.©2011 Daniel J. Splaine-TEST of TIME PHOTO

Squid fishing boat passing under the setting sun in Ko-Panang , Thailand. This photograph is an example of the “image making” approach to photography that professional photographer and photo educator Dan Splaine teaches in his photo workshops and tours. Careful observation, composition and timing are the factors that add to a photographic result.

I am constantly referring to “image making” in my digital photography workshops and photography tours.  My goal as a photo educator is to help my students build their understanding and skills so they can fulfill their creative intent or more simply to make the photographs they imagine.  The approach I advocate to photography is all about understanding the mechanics of cameras and photographic techniques in order to achieve the greatest amount of creative control.  Photography is a remarkable melding of art and science and digital cameras are extraordinary tools for personal expression.

 

My objective as a photo educator is to enable my photography students to realize their creative intention.  My approach is to build the skills and technical understanding that allows my students to make photographs in any condition with a deliberate creative objective. Learning digital camera controls, developing an understanding of light and the relationship between the two is the core of the image making technique.

Another element of image making is to develop your photographer’s eye, to begin to see the world photographically.  When we are observing a scene an analysis of lighting conditions, optical choices and design considerations should be made before we raise our camera.  Good photographers are careful observers and good photography should be deliberate in conception and execution.

Photography is a wonderful medium for creatively expressing an individual point of view.  How we understand and adapt all of the photographic tools available and apply them to our observations is at the heart of that expression.   Building photographic knowledge and skills provide creative control and ultimately greater satisfaction in the photography produced.   Reconsider your photographic approach and make to move from “picture taker to image maker.”

Photographer Dan Splaine of  Test of Time Photography in Nashua, NH presents a full program of digital photography workshops and photographer tours for adult photographers of all skill levels. Currently we have several photo workshops scheduled for September and October as well as a 10 day photography tour in Ireland in April 2012.  Our fall program includes a photography weekend in the White Mountains of New Hampshire on October 15-16, 2011. Click on the links above for further information about our upcoming program.  For more information or to answer any questions send me an email at info@testoftimephoto.com.

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Photography HOW-TO: Window Light portraits

WINDOW LIGHT PORTRAITS

 

 

Example of potrait made with window light by photographer Dan Splaine

Portrait of young women made with available window lighting. Photograph©2009 Daniel J. Splaine -TEST of TIME PHOTO

 

One of the most common subjects and one of the most challenging for in-experienced photographers is portraits.  Photographing people requires communication skills and photographic techniques that can be intricate and hard to manage. Lighting for portrait photography can be infinitely complex but I want to suggest a simpler method that can produce fantastic results and make your portraits look great.

Window light is an exceptionally useful lighting source for your portrait photography.  By using available light (the window) you avoid the complexity of using flash – artificial light-and the exposure control issues that it presents. We often over complicate the photographic creation process to the detriment of the results we get.  The mantra “keep it simple stupid” (the KISS rule) should come to mind for your next portrait session.  By simplifying the lighting you will be less stressed and can concentrate on developing a positive connection with your subject.

Ambient window light provides a large, even light source that provides a gradual transition from highlight to shadow. That quality of the lighting is soft and natural and can be very flattering for your portrait subjects. Electronic flash tends to be direct, contrasty and destroys the subtle transition between that highlight and shadow which is unflattering for portraiture.

When I refer to “window lighting” I have some particular features and qualities in mind.  Direct noon time sun glaring through your window is equally harsh and unflattering as direct flash.  What I am describing is the soft, diffuse lighting that you get from a cloudy day.  North facing windows on an overcast day provide the best representation for this light source.  This lighting has been used effectively in traditional painting for portraits and still life studies for centuries and should be a standard in your photographic inventory.

How does this old school (some would say original source of lighting) help in the digital camera era? The ability for film or digital sensors to record a range of lighting intensities in your photographic scene is limited.  The dynamic range of the scene is the ratio between the minimum (shadow) and maximum (highlight) recordable light intensities.  The human eye has an amazing ability to distinguish luminance difference, something in the order of 20 stops (20 EV) of exposure range.  Your digital camera sensor has a recording range of somewhere between 6 to 10 stops of exposure depending on size and quality).

Young monks studying in Buddhist temple -Tawang, Arunachal Pradesh, India

Scene from a Tibetan Buddhist Temple in Tawang, Aruncahel Preadesh, India. The lighting of this dark interior space was provided by a large open door ("window light") behind the photographer position. ©2010 Daniel J. Splaine / TEST of TIME PHOTO- All rights reserved

The diffused light from a window is lower in contrast and easily falls in the dynamic range and recording capability of your camera.  Having a dynamic range of 5 to 7 stops of exposure means that camera is readily able to record detail in all the tones from shadow to highlight.  Your results more closely match the natural range of tone we perceive with our eyes and creating a favorable response from the viewer of your photograph.  Simply said the portraits that you can achieve with window lighting closely match what we can see with the natural eye.

By using window light illumination we reduce contrast, the severity of the tonal transition from highlight to shadow. Having a gradual transition in brightness adds dimension to portraits that is favorable to your subject’s appearance.  How we position the transition zone, the arrangement of our subject to the direction of light, is how we control this effect. Learning how to “read” light and using it to improve your images is a fundamental skill.  Using this source with your people photography is great way to build those abilities.

 

Example of potrait made with window light by photographer Dan splaine

Portrait of young women made with available window lighting. Photograph©2009 Daniel J. Splaine -TEST of TIME PHOTO

Another advantage of window lighting is that is a constant light source.  Studio flash heads have a “modeling” light to provide an approximation of the changes in illumination and position make.   You can observe those changes directly with window light.  As you move your subject closer or further from the light or rotate them you will observe the changes in exposure levels and shadows.  You can have side lighting, backlighting or full frontal lighting depending on the position of the subject and the camera location.  Widow light is a very versatile light source that can be adapted for multiple lighting effects.

 

The ironic thing about all of the studio lighting equipment and modifiers that I have purchased for my inventory of photographic tools is that they are primarily used to replicate the qualities of window light. Granted the inventory gives me absolute control and the ability for creating predictable photographic results on demand. For a photographer building their skills as a portrait photographer I would recommend mastering using this available light source and learning about the qualities of light it produces, before I would recommend investing a dime in any advance lighting equipment.

I often extol my students in my photography workshops and tours about the importance of practice in becoming a better photographer. Giving yourself regular photo assignments to be accomplished is great way to help your performance with your digital camera.  Window light is readily available so why not include it in your next practice session. Go makes some images!

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Why should you attend a photography workshop?

 

Photography is a subject that is worthy of, and to be done well, requires study.  My nearly 35 years behind the camera has been a continuous learning experience.  Not only do I present photography workshops – I often attend them.  Photography workshops provide an opportunity to remove yourself from the distractions of your daily life to spend some dedicated hours or days building your photographic skills. Photography workshops often can inspire and reinvigorate your passion for image making. Digital photography in particular has a significant learning curve and attendance in a photo class can help leapfrog your learning.  Workshops presented by a well qualified instructor provide a forum to explore photographic concepts and creative techniques beyond your current skill level

Photography student during photography workshop hosted by photographer Dan Splaine at the Isle of Shoals in New Hampshire.

Photo workshop student shooting on Star Island

 

How often do you actually pick up your camera and dedicate time to specifically making photographs?

No doubt those occasions are rare.  A dedicated period of time concentrating solely of photography is the best way to rapidly advance your photo skills.  Even a few hours provide an opportunity to focus on your creative approach to photography subjects. In my experience continuous photography during multi day and weeks long travels are really productive.

Workshops about a particular digital photographic topic or technique provide you the opportunity to explore new methods. Selecting a photo workshop that provides access to a unique location or specialized tools gives you a chance to test drive those techniques.  I often host classes about studio lighting which allow new photographers to use lighting equipment and work with models they normally do not have access to. My photography tours bring photographers to locations that have been scouted and selected for their photographic potential. Workshops that feature a particular photo editing software help inform your purchasing decisions.

The social component of photography workshops adds important value.  Spending a day with other people who share your interest in photography is another benefit of photo classes.  In my opinion photography is a highly individualized form of personal expression.  It is definitely not a team sport.  That being said, the social exchange of ideas and the insights you can gain from a group of photographers can only build your understanding.  In group critique sessions I find the peer-to-peer commentary and conversation well-informed and inspirational.  Other perspectives on your photography and techniques are great learning tools. (To attend one of my photography review sessions click here).

Photographic ability and skills can be learned and have to be practiced.  Attending a photography workshop will build your skills, confidence and inspiration.  The investment of money and time can be justified by the value you receive, by how your creative ability to make photographs will increase.

I offer a program of digital photography workshops and photography tours (over 400 people attend in the last 18 months!) for adults.  Some of the workshops are single photo topic sessions held at my studio or conducted in the field at nearby locations.  Others are daylong sessions (like our Isle of Shoals Workshop held 7/23/11) or weekend packages   (like our March 2011 weekend in Quebec, Canada).  In addition to photo classes my schedule for the fall of 2011 includes a Photographers Weekend in the White Mountains (October 15-16). In April of 2012 I am leading a ten-day photography and cultural exploration in Ireland for STRABO tours.  For more information and to receive notices of all my photography workshop contact me at info@testoftimephoto.com.

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GOOD PHOTOGRAPHER HABITS – PHOTO SKILL BUILDERS (Part 2 of 2)

Here is the second set of my ten tips for habits all photographers should use to become better image makers. Good digital image making and the process of photography starts with knowledge and cognitive skills. I found that these habits and behaviors sharpen my photographic skills and elevate my awareness of the photographic process.

OBSERVE AND UNDERSTAND THE QUALITIES OF LIGHT: Pay attention to light – all light, even the absence of light (shadow)! Observe the intensity and direction of light and how it falls in your scene.  Understand the reflectivity of subject tone and surface and how you can represent them in your image.  How much light do you have on your scene and how does it affect the subject?

Learn to see “photographically”. Light is your instrument as a photographer, you are a “light writer” ( photo graphikos in Greek or photo graphis from Latin).  Examine the transition from highlight to shadow in your scene; learn to recognize the contrast and dynamic range of your lighting.  It is all about light so master your understanding of how it affects your image making.

UNDERSTAND EXPOSURE – MAKE GOOD EXPOSURES: There is no better guarantee of quality then a accurately exposed image. Proper exposure, the measuring, recording, color balancing and setting selection determine the quality of your data. The better the data quality at the point of image capture, the better your image will be.  Practice using your light meter on subjects of a variety of tones – make note of how it responds to differing of conditions.  Understand the relationship between aperture, shutter speed, and ISO (the exposure triangle). Learn how to interpret and refine the information included in the histogram.  Understand what the meta data means on your camera display so you can analyze the quality of your exposure.  Learn how to use exposure compensation and bracketing to really refine the quality of the exposures you make.

DESIGN & COMPOSE YOUR IMAGES CAREFULLY: Crop with your camera and remember to move your feet and your position relative to your subject and the direction of light.  Really examine the contents of your frame and judiciously decide what subject elements are visually interesting.   Be disciplined in the visual arrangement in your images, edit with your camera not your computer.  Look at your frame and select the image components to include and exclude carefully.  Fill the frame!

ALWAYS WORK ON A COPY- never the original image file: This is an essential habit in the era of digital photography.  In film we had a fixed staring point…..the negative was permanent,  and it contained a finite amount of information that offered a finite set of options for visual interpretation.  Remember that until you make a backup copy your digital photo is a one of a kind original.

Make it a habit to make copies immediately after uploading them from your camera to your computer, even before looking at them!  Back up your images onto removable media as often as you can and keep a remote archive.  Redundant copies ensure that you can always go back to your original source material.   In the future you will have an expanded set of post production options for what you can do with those files so mare archiving your habit

LOOK AT OTHER IMAGERY: Start looking at the photography and images in your daily experience critically.  Look at all art and design – analyze your response as a viewer and consider how to recreate those effects in your images.  I would encourage you to start learning about some of the great photographers from the past.  The luxury of books of photography is nice but do not forget tools like GOOGLE images.  You have a virtual connection to the works of thousands of photographers a mouse click away!   De-construct an image to define the creative and technical choices made.  Look for inspiration – steal good ideas!

 

I hope that you embrace these suggested habits to build your photography skills. They work for digital photographers of all skill levels and I recommend them to all of the students at my photography workshops and photo tours.  For more information on my program of photo classes and tours got to info@testoftimephoto.com.

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GOOD PHOTOGRAPHER HABITS – PHOTO SKILL BUILDERS (Part 1 of 2)

Over the decades I have spent being a student and teacher of photography I have learned many techniques and methods to make better photographs.  From the good old days of darkrooms and fixer fumes to the wave after wave of rapidly evolving digital image making, photography has been my constant learning experience.

From that, I have developed a set of habits that I encourage my photography students and old hands with cameras to embrace and make their own.  Some of the ten tips (5 in this post,5 more to come)  I provide to improve your digital photography may seem a little obvious but remain important.  The fact that they are obvious may lead to them being easily overlooked.  This is a distillation of insight acquired in over thirty years of learning and working at becoming a better photographer and will help you do the same.

ALWAYS BRING YOUR CAMERA :  The number one reason why people miss good pictures is because they don’t have a camera with them! Make it a habit to always carry a camera with you, because you never know what you could miss.  If you do not have your full digital SLR kit with you at least consider carrying a point and shoot camera. Compact digital cameras are simple to bring everywhere.  A basic camera, with a few memory cards, batteries give the capacity of taking thousands of images.  Be ready to shoot and make the most of your everyday observations and moments. Photography skills are built by making images not by wishing you had your camera with you!

 

Scenes from digital photography workshops & photo tours offered by Dan SplaineSHOOT, SHOOT, SHOOT! and then Shoot more : If you think you shoot enough – you don’t (especially if you have a digital camera, because there is no added cost to taking more photographs).  Why take just one picture if you can take several?  Make a regular habit using and operating your camera in a wide variety of shooting conditions. Attempt to make images in ordinary and exceptional moments of your daily experiences to practice your photographic craft.

Are you in a place you may never visit again?  Your opportunity costs (the price of getting there) is a major investment when compared to the minimal cost of making digital photos.  Is this something you will ever see or experience ever again?  Is this such a common experience that you  have never looked at it for its image  potential ?  Take a picture, because even the most boring day-to-day scenes can become historical in just a few years of time.  Practice your skills on a daily basis.

 

TRUST YOUR EYE: Studying the laws of composition is fine, but when it comes down to it you must trust your eye.  Make a conscious effort to scrutinize the arrangement of the subject elements in your scene thoughtfully. When you frame the shot, move your camera position and fully explore the scene. When you find an angle or composition that FEELS good to you, take the picture immediately!  After the first frame, which is your instinctive response, you can (and should) get several more shots.  Compare that sequence of shots on the computer to learn about your photographic point of view. Your personal style will change and improve with time.  The viewpoint you take with a camera is distinct and interesting. Trust your instinctive response to the view of the scene and build your trust in your point of view.

Train your eye: Look at the photographs you have taken and analyze them,  begin to critique your own work. How does it match up to what came to mind (pre-visualization) before you pushed the trigger?  Did the image turn out like you planned? Do you like the composition? Critically analyze the aesthetics, the emotional impact and the technical features of your photographs.

This self-review stage is essential for you to improve your photographic skills and style.  Examine how the light source and direction affect the scene. How well did you capture the scene as you visualized it?  How was your focus control and the accuracy of your exposure settings?  Deconstructing your image making techniques and comparing the results to your creative intent builds your photographer’s “eye”.

Know your camera: You don’t need to memorize every feature right away, but over time you should be comfortable enough so that operating your camera becomes second nature. It’s like learning to shift gears or ride a bicycle – only when the machine controls become instinctive are you really driving.  Understanding the mechanical functions and how they affect your images is essential to gaining control over your results.  What does your F stop selection or aperture do to change the look of the photo?  How does your light meter respond to different subject conditions? What settings can you select to match a particular lighting situation?  Practice using your camera controls in no pressure shooting conditions so you will be ready for your more important photographic opportunities.

 

This collections of habits for building your photographic skills is the first 5 of 10 that I offer to digital photography students that attend one of my photography workshops.  To learn more about the workshops and tours please contact me at info@testoftiemphoto.com.

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The power of PUBLIC RELATIONS photography-10 tips for building your “image”

Photography is an important tool for creating and building individual and corporate identity that is often under utilized, and from my point of view as a professional photographer certainly under appreciated.  Photography has always been an effective public relations tool. My experience goes back thirty years to the days of setting up darkrooms in all kinds of locations and hustling wet prints to the nearest wire service office.  Today with our powerful digital photography capabilities and the infinite requirement the internet has for content its value as a PR device has never been so great.

I would argue that all enterprises and individual entrepreneurs should incorporate photography into their PR and marketing programs.  Listed below are ten suggested ideas and methods for utilizing public relations photography to build your “image” and enhance your personal brand.

  1. Prepare a set of high quality photographs in advance to anticipate a media request or public relations opportunity.  Having some shot “in the can” that illustrate your products, facilities and key personnel that are ready to send will help you capitalize on unexpected  publication offers.
  2. Business portraits and headshots are essential for any entrepreneur.  Having a professionally created portrait of your company personnel is necessary in building a personal connection via social media.  The business mantra that “people buy from who they know “is still true today and your portrait online is a powerful method to become “known”.  These shots are great for business notices and identifiers for blog postings and other marketing material.
  3. Headshots are great for some uses but having an environmental type portrait will work best with editorial outlets.  Images of the person in their work environment or in a setting that adds information about them are better illustrations for editors.  Environmental portraits provide context for the person and more readily transmit a narrative to the viewer.
  4. Make the investment in professional photography services. Digital cameras are common and seemingly in every device you can imagine, truly anyone can take a picture. The distinction for the purposes of your brand is that snapshots will not enhance your image.  Professionally conceived and created photography literally presents you in the best light.  Hire a pro to achieve professional results.
  5. Provide editors and media outlets a good variety of images to select from.  The more options they have in layout and design choices the greater the likelihood your images will be published.  A mix of portrait (vertical) and landscape (horizontal) orientated photos, shots with negative space for headlines and copy and unique points of view are all appreciated by editors, so give them what makes them happy!
  6. Follow submission guidelines carefully.  Sending an image correctly formatted and prepared according to the publications requirements is essential.  Send the photography and illustration incorrectly and you will not get published.  Using a pro photographer adept with photo editing tools and familiar with the process can be critical to avoiding submission problems.
  7. Use images that tell a story and specifically match up to the narrative you are providing with the press release content it is accompanying.  Your visual content is critical to convincing an editor of your value for publication. Photos get stories printed and most importantly read so send out complete packages.
  8. Make sure to correctly caption and keyword  your images to take advantage of the SEO potential photography has as online content.  Image file meta data is searchable text that can be enhanced to maximize your branding and messaging online. Once again using a pro photographer familiar with this process will justify the investment in will add power to your imagery.
  9. Make sure you fill the frame.  Avoid using photography that has a lot of vacant area that makes the subject smaller and distracts the viewer.  Well designed and composed photographs capture the viewer’s attention so take care to use the whole image area well.
  10. Take chances with your photography and show unusual viewpoints and scenes.  Often a story will get published simply because the photography is so attention grabbing.  The same visual impact that gets the editor’s attention works doubly on attracting the viewer to your messaging.

I provide photography for business , shot either on location or in my studio facility in Nashua, NH.  My experience with public relations assignments and live action coverage has ranged from tropical jungles to corporate boardrooms.   For more information about PR photography or any of my other photography services for business contact me at info@testoftimephoto.com

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